Barbara Cartland, and In the Stillness of the Starry Night

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In the joy of your heart,
Your light remains

In the gift of your caring,
Your light remains

Where you reached out to help,
Your light remains

Where you sat in silent peace,
Your light remains

In the place where you worked,
Your light remains

In the stillness of the starry night,
Your light remains

In the light of each day fully embraced,
Your light remains

Like the touch of an Angel,
Your light remains

When you live as a light,
Your heart is joined in the Infinite Light of Love.
And that about you which is eternal…remains.

—Reverend Jacquie Riker

Barbara Cartland’s status as a preeminent “prolific pen” is doubtless: she wrote 623 books and sold more than 650 million copies of her novels worldwide in many languages. Even The Guinness Book of World Records named her as the world’s top-selling author! Upon her passing on May 20, 2000, she remained the twentieth century’s best-known writer of romance.

Born on July 9, 1901, this British writer went on to dominate popular fiction throughout the century. She began her writing career with a gossip column in the Daily Express newspaper, an ironic choice for a woman who would become the relative of one of the most gossiped-about women in the history of the world, Princess Diana. By 1925, Cartland had moved to full fiction with her debut novel, Jigsaw, and had been presented at court. From this beginning, she released new novels at a furious pace, with such titles as The Ruthless Rake, The Penniless Peer, and The Cruel Count, as well as several volumes of autobiography and other nonfiction works, such as The Etiquette Book; Love, Life, and Sex; Look Lovely, Be Lovely; and Barbara Cartland’s Book of Beauty and Health, for which she received strong criticism due to a very old-fashioned and rather antifeminist view of women as the “inferior” gender.

This dissatisfaction passed quickly, though, and Barbara retained her crown as the world-renowned queen of romance novels. In 1950, she moved to Camfield Place, the house built by Beatrix Potter’s grandfather, where Potter wrote The Tale of Peter Rabbit. Many movies have been based on Cartland’s beloved books, including A Hazard of Hearts, A Duel of Hearts, The Flame Is Love, The Ghost of Monte Carlo, and The Lady and the Highwayman, and her position at the top of the heap is in no danger. No other writer has written so much for so many as Dame Barbara Cartland.


The Book of awesome women writers

Medieval Mystics, Pioneering Poets, Fierce Feminists and First Ladies of Literature (Feminist Book, Gift for Women, Gift for Writers)

This one-of-a-kind tome takes a tour with Sylvia Beach and other booksellers as well as librarians, editors, writers, bibliophiles, and celebrated book clubs. Join women’s studies scholar Anders as she takes you on a ribald ride through the pages of history. Chapter titles include “Prolific Pens” (including Joyce Carol Oates, author of over 100 books), “Mystics, Memoirists and Madwomen”, “Salons and Neosalons”, “Ink in Their Veins” (literary dynasties), and the titillating “Banned, Blacklisted, and Arrested.”


The Woman's Book of Prayer by Becca Anderson

The Woman’s Book of Prayer

365 Blessings, Poems and Meditations

Prayer takes many forms: sitting in silence, walking mediation, using prayer beads or folding your hands every night and talking to God. If you want something different in your life, you must pray a different prayer. We are constantly communing with the Divine throughout our daily lives – even in the most ordinary activities. Comprised of both mindfulness meditations, prayer practices and selections of sacred texts, poems and blessings, Becca Anderson, author of Prayers for Hard Times and Every Day Thankful, gathers words of encouragement, comfort and sustenance for women. From Peace Pilgrim to Psalms to Dolly Parton, this collection of power thoughts and purposeful prayers will help you get inspired, and more importantly, stay inspired.