Edwidge Danticat- Immigrant, Author, Mother, Daughter, Lover

Becca Anderson, author of You Are An Awesome Woman, has written a new blog post on the life and career of author Edwidge Danticat, take a look!

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Edwidge Danticat is a Haitian American short story writer and novelist; born in 1969, she started writing while in Haiti before coming to the US at age twelve to live in a Haitian neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York. As a disoriented teenage immigrant, she found solace in literature. At Barnard College in New York City, she originally intended to study nursing, but ended up graduating with a BA in French literature before going on to earn a master’s degree in creative writing from Brown University in 1993. Her master’s thesis formed the basis for her novel Breath, Eyes, Memory (1994), which became an Oprah’s Book Club selection in 1998.

Her novels since include Krik? Krak!, The Farming of Bones, The Dew Breaker, Create Dangerously, and Claire of the Sea Light, as well as her youth fiction works Anacaona, Behind the Mountains, Eight Days, The Last Mapou, Mama’s Nightingale, and Untwine. Her memoir Brother, I’m Dying won the National Book Critics Circle Award for autobiography in 2008. She has edited several collections of essays and authored a travel narrative, After the Dance: A Walk Through Carnival in Jacmel, Haiti, which gives readers an inside look at the cultural legacy of the land of her birth. Danticat is best known for her exploration of the developing identity of Haitian immigrants, the politics of the diaspora, especially as related to the experience of women, and mother/ daughter relationships. Since the publication of her first novel in 1994, she has consistently won accolades for her literary accomplishments.


You Are an Awesome Woman

Affirmations and Inspired Ideas for Self-Care, Success and a Truly Happy Life

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