Author Talk with Marita Golden

Marita Golden (author of The Strong Black Woman) will discuss her new book with DC Public Library on October 7th.
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Author Talk with Marita Golden

October 7, 2021 @ 6:00 pm 7:00 pm

Marita Golden (author of The Strong Black Woman) will discuss her new book with DC Public Library on October 7th.

Event Details:

Join author Marita Golden and Dr. Pamela Brewer on the Library’s Facebook page and YouTube channel on Thursday, October 7 at 6 p.m. for a conversation on Golden’s new book, The Strong Black Woman.

Join author Marita Golden and licensed Clinical Social Worker, Dr. Pamela Brewer on the Library’s Facebook page and YouTube channel on Thursday, October 7 at 6 p.m. for a conversation on Golden’s new book, The Strong Black Woman: How a Myth Endangers the Physical and Mental Health of Black Women.

In The Strong Black Woman, Golden writes about her own journey from Strong Black Woman to New Age Strong Black Woman who prioritizes self-care. Colorism, mental health, rape culture, how and why Black women fail to grieve and the stories that Black women rely on to heal are among the topics covered in this book which adds to the evolving public discourse about Black women’s health.

Golden is a native Washingtonian, the co-founder of the Hurston/Wright Foundation, a creative writing coach and the author of 17 widely read works of fiction and non-fiction. Golden was Johnson’s writing teacher at the Hurston/Wright Foundation’s Writers Week Workshop in the summer of 2011.

Dr. Brewer who was interviewed for The Strong Black Woman, earned her MSW in Clinical Social Work from New York University. Brewer went on to receive her Ph.D. in Social Psychology from the Union Institute and University in Cincinnati, Ohio. Brewer is a Board Certified Licensed Clinical Social Worker with over thirty years of postgraduate clinical experience.

Mental Health Awareness Week is October 3-October 9 and National Depression Screening Day is October 7. Join us for this very important conversation about Black women and their mental health.



The Strong Black Woman

How a Myth Endangers the Physical and Mental Health of Black Women

“Black don’t crack”. The Strong Black Woman Syndrome is a racist and sexist archetype created to marginalize Black women. It is a toxic ideology that is a major factor contributing to the dismal health metrics for Black women, showing that four out of five are overweight and are more likely to suffer a stroke or heart attack than White women. The syndrome calls on Black women to be the problem-solvers and chief caretakers for everyone in their lives. “Black don’t crack” is a familiar adage. We never buckle, never feel vulnerable, and never bother others with our pain.

Black women face a hidden mental health crisis of anxiety and depression. To be a Black woman in America is to know that you cannot protect your children or guarantee their safety, that your value is consistently questioned, and that even being “twice as good” is often not good enough. Consequently, Black women disproportionately experience anxiety and depression. Studies now conclusively connect racism and mental health―and physical health.