Your Magical Home: Amulets

Cerridwen Greenleaf, author of Dark Moon Magic, has written a new blog post on the power that amulets hold and their protective abilities- learn more here.

The term “amulet” comes from the Latin word meaning “defense.” Indeed, amulets are a way to protect yourself that dates back from the earliest human beliefs. Pliny himself subscribed to the use of amulets and wrote about three common kinds used by the Romans of the classical age. A typical amulet of that era was a bit of parchment inscribed with protective words, rolled up in a metal cylinder, and worn around the neck. Evil eyes might be the most global of all amulets, the belief being that they could ward off a hex by simply reflecting it back to its origins. Phallic symbols have always been popular, too, coming in the shapes of horns, hands, and the phallus, of course. Some amulets were devoted to a specific god or goddess, and the wearer of such a piece would be protected by that divine entity.The peoples of the Mesopotamian plain wore amulets. The Assyrians and Babylonians favored cylindrical seals encrusted with precious stones. They also loved animal talismans for the qualities associated with different animals: lions for courage, bulls for virility, and so on. The ancient Egyptians absolutely depended on their amulets for use in burial displays, and we can see many preserved in the cases of today’s museums.

To make their amulets, the Egyptians employed a material called faience, a glazed composition of ground quartz that was typically blue green in color. Wealthier denizens of the Nile, royalty, and the priestly class wore precious and semiprecious gems and crystals as amulets. Lapis lazuli was perhaps the most revered of these and was worn in many shapes, the eye of Horus being the most significant religious icon, followed by the scarab symbolizing rebirth; the frog, symbolizing fertility; and the ankh, representing eternal life.

Organized religions appropriated the idea of amulets from pagan peoples, and it was very popular in medieval times to wear a tiny verse from the Torah, the Bible, or the Koran. Today, many a Catholic wears a medal honoring a given saint, such as Saint Christopher, the patron saint for travelers. Wiccans and modern pagans are great proponents of protective amulets, causing a resurgence in Celtic symbols and imagery.

Amulets are very easy to create and make nice gifts, as long as you believe your friends will truly benefit from them and are aware of the special qualities and powers they hold. To make one, select a crystal that is endowed with the desired energy. Hold it in the palm of your hand until it is warm from your touch. Then, visualize the specific power the stone is offering. If you’re giving your amulet to yourself, wear it as a pendant or tuck it into your pocket or purse for a “guardian to go.” Here is a list of stones from which to choose for the specific kind of safeguard you are in need of:

Amethyst helps with sobriety by preventing inebriation

Aquamarine is good for attracting wisdom and overcoming a fear of water and drowning. It is also a guard against malevolent spirits.

Bloodstone brings luck and is good to wear during travels.

Carnelian is to the devil as garlic is to a vampire—keeps him away!

Chrysolite drives away evil spirits and promotes peaceful sleep, especially if set in gold.

Diamond in a necklace brings good fortune and lends force and valor. This dazzling stone should always touch the skin and works best when it is received as a gift.

Emerald can cancel out the power of any magician!

Jade offers protection, especially for children, and guards their health. It also creates prosperity.

Jasper is reputed to be a defense against the venom of poisonous insects and snakes.

Jet set in silver will help expel negativity

Moonstone is another boon to travelers and brings fortune and fame

Turquoise is believed to be great for a horse’s gait if affixed to the animal’s bridle


Dark Moon Magic by Cerridwen Greenleaf

Dark moon magic

Supernatural Spells, Charms, and Rituals for Health, Wealth, and Happiness

Take advantage of centuries of knowledge: In this utterly unique grimoire, bestselling author Cerridwen Greenleaf gathers celestial lore, history, and mythology, drawing from the Dark Ages mystical practices of the original Gothic tribes, Scandinavian shamans and other medieval sources to infuse these spells with the magic of the ancients, allowing the modern reader to tap into that pure power. Here, you’ll learn how to call upon the fairy world and little-known gods and goddesses to empower your magical workings, as well as ways to consecrate and wield magical tools, create a home and garden full of enchantment, and rituals to enhance every aspect of your life. With Dark Moon Magic, she has crafted nothing less than a Wiccan mystery school in book form.

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